Print

Conversational Intimacy, Craved more than chocolate

Author: Judith E. Glaser

conversational intimacy

Intimacy starts with an intelligent conversation, a verbal or nonverbal valentine. Our brains are designed to be social. Our need for belonging is more powerful than our need for safety. When we are rejected, we experience pain in the same centers in the brain and body as when we are in a car crash. Being emotionally orphaned is more painful than death.

When others show us love, respect, and honor us, it triggers the same centers in the brain as when we eat chocolate, have sex, or are on drugs.

Learning these emotional facts of life will change how you live, love and lead. 

Print

Confessing is a Cousin to Courage

Author: Sandra Ford Walston, The Courage Expert

Our culture has a tendency to highlight sensational, amazing, miraculous or scandalous acts of courage, such as confessing you were a draft-dodger, confronting a robber with a gun or harming your spouse. The assessment is that if your story is not a headline it can’t be valuable. Not so. I was recently asked  how courage manifests itself in daily living.

Dear Sandra:

There are many times I find myself responding to a discussion topic as if I know something about it when in fact, I don’t. I feel if I reveal my lack of knowledgeable I will be perceived as unintelligent (silly, I know). Other times, I find myself innocently covering up or glossing over an incident instead of confessing. What’s the best plan of action to apply courage?   Read More

Print

Volunteering Equals Win Win

Author: Marci Garson

by Marci Garson

You’ve worked like a dog, raised your kids and now there’s a new equation: Volunteering one-on-one= win-win.volunteering

The first time we met 6 year–old Michael, he leaped out of his seat and threw his arms around my son Tosh.  “My very own volunteer!” he exclaimed as the social worker gently reminded Michael, “Big boys don’t hug, they shake hands.”   My son and I had already been prepped to be aware of our physical contact with Michael because, like the 300 other kids who live at The Pleasantville Cottage Schools in Westchester, NY, he had been physically and mentally abused and neglected.

Twitter: @SuccessTV

No tweets found.
Extensions by SiteGroundweb hosting

Joomla! Debug Console