Articles

Print

Advice on Feeling and Looking Younger

Written by Rita Kennen

Make yourself a lean, mean energy machine!well.woman.smile          

If you feel good, you'll look good. If you look good, you'll feel young. ---Erika Schwartz M.D.-author, Natural Energy

Rejuvenating Brains Despite Aging
Bioenergetics is the science of how the body uses energy.
Fuel for the body is manufactured in cell structures called mitochondria.
The highest concentrations of mitochondria are in hardworking organs like the heart, liver and brain.
As you age, so do your mitochondria. Without any compensation, your body may fall into an energy crisis.

The number of people who don't listen to their own bodies amazes Dr. Erika Schwartz. "We keep pushing harder and harder and then are surprised when our bodies break down."

Schwartz is a practicing internist, former director of a hospital emergency room and single mother of two girls. She's also the creator of a natural energy makeover that she claims will take you from Tired to Terrific in 10 Days, Natural Energy.

Her message is simple: Tune-up your body the same way you tune-up your car. Give it the attention it needs and it'll run for a very long time.

How you manufacture energy Schwartz is a pioneer in the hot new field of bioenergetics: the science of how your body uses energy. The process of transforming food and nutrients into energy is called metabolism.

The food you eat is broken down by the digestive tract. This digested food is turned into nutrients by microscopic cell structures called mitochondria. Mitochondria take those nutrients and turn them into fuel. Although they occur everywhere in the body, mitochondria are more densely concentrated in organs with the toughest jobs like the heart, brain and kidneys.

When you're young, mitochondria are strong and produce all the fuel your body needs to keep it going. But as years pass, the mitochondria lose shape and structure and become less likely to produce a sufficient amount of fuel. If you don't compensate, your body goes through what Schwartz calls an energy crisis.

Related Items

Rejuvenating Brains Despite Age
How our beliefs affect our lives
Midlife Athletes on Aging
DVD:Stephen Covey on a Successful Life
Bulk up you muscles
Nutritional lowdown on beer
Lose weight without dieting


Seven Signals of a Body Energy Crisis

Dr. Erika Schwartz knew something was amiss when she returned from a relaxing vacationfeeling sick exhausted and ill with a virus. Even after medical tests indicated she'd recovered from the virus, she still felt tired. For the first time in her 45 years, an unhappy Schwartz knew her body was slowing down.

Expand Your "Comfort Zone" and feel younger
Constant fatigue is a universal symptom of a low energy level.
Understanding the messages your body is sending is the first step towards increasing your energy.
Most people suffer from more than one of the seven signs of an energy crisis.

That sent her digging deep into research on fatigue. She asked 300 people about how much energy they did or didn't have. "We didn't give them a list," says Schwartz. "But instead asked them to tell us what makes you think you don't have enough energy."

Working with her patients, Schwartz created this list of the seven warning signs of a depleted energy system. How many of these symptoms fit you?

  • Your mind and body disagree. This happens when your brain says go but your body says no way.
  • You drag yourself out of bed every morning.
  • You constantly yearn for an afternoon nap.
  • Your head feels like it's in a fog.
  • You find yourself searching for a quick sugar fix several times during the day.
  • You feel blue and can't figure out why.
  • You'd rather sleep than have sex.
  • If any of these warning signs sound familiar, take comfort in the fact that a gradual decline in energy is not irreversible.

    Related Items

    Rejuvenating Brains Despite Age
    How our beliefs affect our lives
    Midlife Athletes on Aging
    How to bulk up you muscles
    Nutritional lowdown on beer
    Lose weight without dieting
    Tap into the Root of All Happiness
    DVD:Stephen Covey on a Successful Life

    Become a Lean, Mean Energy Machine

    Just as an older car requires more maintenance to run efficiently, your body may need more attention to keep on truckin'. So says Dr. Erika Schwartz, author of Tired to Terrific in Ten Days, Natural Energy.

    ADVICE
    Listening to your body is the best way to prevent illness.
    The signals for hunger and fatigue come from the same part of the brain.
    Many people confuse the two and eat when they are really just tired.
    Exercise is important, but never workout when you're sick.
    You can't sweat out the virus when you body really needs rest.
    To find out more, visit Erika Schwartz's Web site.

    Schwartz recommends two over-the-counter nutritional supplements that are made naturally by the body and are critical to energy production, and whose levels decline with age. The first is carnitine, an amino acid that transports fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they are made into energy. Carnitine also helps build hormones, strengthens cell membranes, and controls fat.

    The second one is a supplement that works in conjunction with carnitine: coenzyme Q10. Once carnitine gets the fatty acids into the mitochondria, CoQ10 helps turn them into energy. Recent research also shows that CoQ10 helps fight heart disease and enhances the immune system.

    Junk in, Junk out: Eat mitochondria-friendly foods
    "If you put in junk, your body has to clean up after you," says Schwartz. "If you eat good food, your body will thank you for it." She recommends eating foods rich in:

    Magnesium:Whole grains, leafy green vegetables, bananas and meat all increase your level of magnesium, which jumpstarts enzymes that increase energy production.

    Phytochemicals:Fruits and vegetables have an antioxidant quality that protects your cells from free-radical damage. Shop by richness of color. Reds, yellows, oranges and greens are a great guide to finding nutrient rich veggies and fruits.

    Energy stealing foods: Avoid high fat, high sugar and processed foods, loaded with transfats. The key, says Schwartz, is balance. "Eating junk food occasionally is OK," she explains. "But if you eat French fries today, don't eat them every day for the next two weeks."

    Lifestyle habits have a tremendous effect on your level of energy. Schwartz advises against cramming as much as you can into every waking hour. Instead, listen to your body, get enough sleep, de-stress, remain open to life and embrace new ideas. She says, "If you're tired, go to sleep. Don't go shopping. It's as simple as that."

    Related Items

    Rejuvenating Brains Despite Age
    How our beliefs affect our lives
    Midlife Athletes on Aging
    Bulk up you muscles
    Nutritional lowdown on beer
    Lose weight without dieting
    Tap into the Root of All Happiness
    DVD:Stephen Covey on a Successful Life

    Joomla! Debug Console

    Session

    Profile Information

    Memory Usage

    Database Queries