Curious about women and courage, everyday courage or how to apply courageous leadership--this is the blog for you. No sensational stories, heroism or drama, just the understanding of how to apply courage at work or in your personal life. There is a direct correlation between your success quotient and your courage quotient. What would you do right now if you had "unlimited courage?" Do you have courage?

Sandra Ford Walston

Sandra Ford Walston

Sandra Ford Walston, The Courage Expert and innovator of StuckThinking™, is an international speaker and author, human potential consultant, corporate trainer and certified coach. Sandra’s expertise allows her to focus on the tricks and traps of the human condition through recognizing and interpreting courage behaviors and courageous leadership styles.


 


Featured on the speaker circuit as witty, provocative, concrete and insightful, she has sparked positive change in the lives of thousands of leaders each year. Sandra also provides skills-based programs for some of the most respected public and private blue-chip businesses and organizations in the world, such as IBM, Caterpillar, Inc., Institute of Internal Auditors, Hensel Phelps, Wide Open West, Agrium, Inc., Virginia Commonwealth University, Xanterra Parks & Resorts®, Procter and Gamble, Hitachi Consulting, US Bank, Healthcare Association of New York State, Institute of Management Accountants, and Delta Kappa Gamma International Society.


 


The internationally published author of bestseller COURAGE The Heart and Spirit of Every Woman and an honored author selected for Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic, Sandra facilitates individuals and groups to discover the power and inspiration of their everyday courage.


 


The COURAGE Difference at Work: A Unique Success Guide for Women, Sandra’s follow-up book to COURAGE, is directed at any woman, regardless of title or credentials, who wishes to grow professionally by introducing courage actions at work. Her third book, FACE IT! 12 Courageous Actions that Bring Success at Work and Beyond confirms that what holds you back on the job is the same as what hinders achievement—the reluctance to face and live a courageous life. Sandra is published in magazines such as Chief Learning Officer, Training & Development, HR Matters, Malaysia, and Strategic Finance.


 


Sandra is a certified Newfield Network coach and certified to administer and interpret the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® along with the Enneagram. She also instructs at the University of Denver.


 


She can be reached at www.sandrawalston.com where she posts a courage blog and courage newsletter.

Posted by on in Life

how to forgive
What is forgiveness? How do you go about forgiving? What happens when you actually go ahead and forgive? Forgiving requires a courageous choice. The courageous choice is whether you are willing to consent to this healing. In Greek, to forgive means “to let go.” Forgiveness is offered without conditions. Using techniques such as forgiveness meditation/prayers or stopping to apply internal reflection, forgiveness can be centered on someone alive or someone who has passed on. In letting go and forgiving, the process is not about wishing they would change. Forgiveness should not be confused with reconciliation. Reconciliation requires mutual interest with...

Posted by on in Career
reframing and noticing our inner dialogue to remove obstacles
A woman who noticed that a high-ranking position would soon be vacated said, “I thought about it and thought about it. So I did the somewhat brazen thing and went over and asked, “Can I have Vicki’s job?” What’s wrong with asking, and why is it “brazen” to ask? This is a perfect example of "scripts" or inner dialogues that multiply over time and define who we are. Left unchecked, they can prevent us from achieving what we want. When you understand your scripts or inner dialogue, you realize how they have limited an honest and clear vision of who you...

Posted by on in Career

courageous behavior in women
What’s your definition of courage and why is it vital to claim it for yourself? Are you curious about why only 11 percent of more than 750 women I researched for five years perceived themselves as courageous? Interviews with the courageous 11 percent made it clear that these women manifest their courage in specific ways. I call these the 12 feminine behaviors of courage: 1.  Affirming strength and determination, 2.  Confronting abuse, 3.  Conquering fear, 4.  Embracing faith, 5.  Hurdling obstacles/taking risks, 6.  Living convictions, 7.  Manifesting vision, 8.  Overcoming illness or loss, 9.  Reflecting self-esteem, 10. Reinventing self, 11. Revealing...
Can you name the first woman to run for president of the United States? Very few people can, but this nineteenth-century woman embodied perseverance demonstrated by the feminine behaviors of courage. By giving herself permission to be courageous, she journeyed through life as a spiritual seeker, individualist and social activist. Misunderstood, ridiculed and rejected, Victoria Claflin Woodhull utilized her talents to become “the first woman stockbroker on Wall Street, the first woman to produce her own newspaper … a fearless lobbyist, businesswoman, writer and investor who advocated for women’s equal status in the workplace, political arena, church and family.” Regardless of...
History frequently glorifies the wrong individuals while overlooking the courageous acts of everyday people. Through intimidation, social, political and religious powerbrokers control perceptions and perpetuate the stories that serve their agendas. Few human beings have ever faced the level of intimidation (one of twelve obstacles to courageous leadership) that Dietrich Bonhoeffer faced in Nazi Germany. A German pastor and theologian, Dietrich was one of the first Germans to oppose Adolf Hitler during his rise to power, and he openly supported the Jews. His life exemplified deep-rooted courage in the face of social, political and religious intimidation. Instead of bowing to threats, he...

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